This Girl
This Girl
+
instagram:


Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPdancers
Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes & hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.
After hearing tips from Russia dancer and Instagrammer Darian Volkova (@darian_volkova) in an earlier post this week, this weekend’s goal is to take creative photos and videos of dancers. Some tips to get you started:
Dancers often like to pose for the camera. Have a friend or acquaintance who’s a professional dancer? Offer to let him or her use your photos and videos in exchange for posing. Remember, though, that anyone can be a dancer! Turn on the music, grab your friends and family and capture the fun of the moment.
Your setting will be key to the kind of story your photo or video tells. For a more classic look, seek out dramatic light and empty spaces. (You may even be able to shoot in a dance school or studio if you secure advance permission.) If you want a more contemporary feel, seek out somewhere where dance would be unexpected like a crowded street, supermarket or wherever your imagination may take you.
Finally, if you’re shooting video, try to limit the amount of motion. It’s difficult to follow a moving dancer if your camera is moving, too, so try and keep your phone still while your dancer moves (or vice versa).
PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPdancers hashtag to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own photographs and videos to the project. Any image or video taken then tagged over the weekend is eligible to be featured right here Monday morning!
instagram:


Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPdancers
Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes & hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.
After hearing tips from Russia dancer and Instagrammer Darian Volkova (@darian_volkova) in an earlier post this week, this weekend’s goal is to take creative photos and videos of dancers. Some tips to get you started:
Dancers often like to pose for the camera. Have a friend or acquaintance who’s a professional dancer? Offer to let him or her use your photos and videos in exchange for posing. Remember, though, that anyone can be a dancer! Turn on the music, grab your friends and family and capture the fun of the moment.
Your setting will be key to the kind of story your photo or video tells. For a more classic look, seek out dramatic light and empty spaces. (You may even be able to shoot in a dance school or studio if you secure advance permission.) If you want a more contemporary feel, seek out somewhere where dance would be unexpected like a crowded street, supermarket or wherever your imagination may take you.
Finally, if you’re shooting video, try to limit the amount of motion. It’s difficult to follow a moving dancer if your camera is moving, too, so try and keep your phone still while your dancer moves (or vice versa).
PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPdancers hashtag to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own photographs and videos to the project. Any image or video taken then tagged over the weekend is eligible to be featured right here Monday morning!
instagram:


Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPdancers
Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes & hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.
After hearing tips from Russia dancer and Instagrammer Darian Volkova (@darian_volkova) in an earlier post this week, this weekend’s goal is to take creative photos and videos of dancers. Some tips to get you started:
Dancers often like to pose for the camera. Have a friend or acquaintance who’s a professional dancer? Offer to let him or her use your photos and videos in exchange for posing. Remember, though, that anyone can be a dancer! Turn on the music, grab your friends and family and capture the fun of the moment.
Your setting will be key to the kind of story your photo or video tells. For a more classic look, seek out dramatic light and empty spaces. (You may even be able to shoot in a dance school or studio if you secure advance permission.) If you want a more contemporary feel, seek out somewhere where dance would be unexpected like a crowded street, supermarket or wherever your imagination may take you.
Finally, if you’re shooting video, try to limit the amount of motion. It’s difficult to follow a moving dancer if your camera is moving, too, so try and keep your phone still while your dancer moves (or vice versa).
PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPdancers hashtag to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own photographs and videos to the project. Any image or video taken then tagged over the weekend is eligible to be featured right here Monday morning!
instagram:


Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPdancers
Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes & hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.
After hearing tips from Russia dancer and Instagrammer Darian Volkova (@darian_volkova) in an earlier post this week, this weekend’s goal is to take creative photos and videos of dancers. Some tips to get you started:
Dancers often like to pose for the camera. Have a friend or acquaintance who’s a professional dancer? Offer to let him or her use your photos and videos in exchange for posing. Remember, though, that anyone can be a dancer! Turn on the music, grab your friends and family and capture the fun of the moment.
Your setting will be key to the kind of story your photo or video tells. For a more classic look, seek out dramatic light and empty spaces. (You may even be able to shoot in a dance school or studio if you secure advance permission.) If you want a more contemporary feel, seek out somewhere where dance would be unexpected like a crowded street, supermarket or wherever your imagination may take you.
Finally, if you’re shooting video, try to limit the amount of motion. It’s difficult to follow a moving dancer if your camera is moving, too, so try and keep your phone still while your dancer moves (or vice versa).
PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPdancers hashtag to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own photographs and videos to the project. Any image or video taken then tagged over the weekend is eligible to be featured right here Monday morning!
instagram:


Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPdancers
Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes & hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.
After hearing tips from Russia dancer and Instagrammer Darian Volkova (@darian_volkova) in an earlier post this week, this weekend’s goal is to take creative photos and videos of dancers. Some tips to get you started:
Dancers often like to pose for the camera. Have a friend or acquaintance who’s a professional dancer? Offer to let him or her use your photos and videos in exchange for posing. Remember, though, that anyone can be a dancer! Turn on the music, grab your friends and family and capture the fun of the moment.
Your setting will be key to the kind of story your photo or video tells. For a more classic look, seek out dramatic light and empty spaces. (You may even be able to shoot in a dance school or studio if you secure advance permission.) If you want a more contemporary feel, seek out somewhere where dance would be unexpected like a crowded street, supermarket or wherever your imagination may take you.
Finally, if you’re shooting video, try to limit the amount of motion. It’s difficult to follow a moving dancer if your camera is moving, too, so try and keep your phone still while your dancer moves (or vice versa).
PROJECT RULES: Please only add the #WHPdancers hashtag to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own photographs and videos to the project. Any image or video taken then tagged over the weekend is eligible to be featured right here Monday morning!
+
instagram:


Reclaiming Penang’s Old Hin Bus Depot with Art
For more photos from Ernest Zacharevic’s solo exhibition in Penang, Malaysia, explore the Hin Company Bus Depot location page.
A reclaimed bus depot in Penang, Malaysia, is home to the first solo show by Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (@ernestzacharevic). Adorning the Hin Company Bus Depot with dozens of murals and other site-specific installations, Zacharevic challenges the distinction between decay and art in an exhibit he’s named “Art is Rubbish/Rubbish is Art.”
The show, which opened on January 17 and runs through February 14, is free and open to the public. Learn more about Zacharevic’s work here.
instagram:


Reclaiming Penang’s Old Hin Bus Depot with Art
For more photos from Ernest Zacharevic’s solo exhibition in Penang, Malaysia, explore the Hin Company Bus Depot location page.
A reclaimed bus depot in Penang, Malaysia, is home to the first solo show by Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (@ernestzacharevic). Adorning the Hin Company Bus Depot with dozens of murals and other site-specific installations, Zacharevic challenges the distinction between decay and art in an exhibit he’s named “Art is Rubbish/Rubbish is Art.”
The show, which opened on January 17 and runs through February 14, is free and open to the public. Learn more about Zacharevic’s work here.
instagram:


Reclaiming Penang’s Old Hin Bus Depot with Art
For more photos from Ernest Zacharevic’s solo exhibition in Penang, Malaysia, explore the Hin Company Bus Depot location page.
A reclaimed bus depot in Penang, Malaysia, is home to the first solo show by Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (@ernestzacharevic). Adorning the Hin Company Bus Depot with dozens of murals and other site-specific installations, Zacharevic challenges the distinction between decay and art in an exhibit he’s named “Art is Rubbish/Rubbish is Art.”
The show, which opened on January 17 and runs through February 14, is free and open to the public. Learn more about Zacharevic’s work here.
instagram:


Reclaiming Penang’s Old Hin Bus Depot with Art
For more photos from Ernest Zacharevic’s solo exhibition in Penang, Malaysia, explore the Hin Company Bus Depot location page.
A reclaimed bus depot in Penang, Malaysia, is home to the first solo show by Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (@ernestzacharevic). Adorning the Hin Company Bus Depot with dozens of murals and other site-specific installations, Zacharevic challenges the distinction between decay and art in an exhibit he’s named “Art is Rubbish/Rubbish is Art.”
The show, which opened on January 17 and runs through February 14, is free and open to the public. Learn more about Zacharevic’s work here.
instagram:


Reclaiming Penang’s Old Hin Bus Depot with Art
For more photos from Ernest Zacharevic’s solo exhibition in Penang, Malaysia, explore the Hin Company Bus Depot location page.
A reclaimed bus depot in Penang, Malaysia, is home to the first solo show by Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (@ernestzacharevic). Adorning the Hin Company Bus Depot with dozens of murals and other site-specific installations, Zacharevic challenges the distinction between decay and art in an exhibit he’s named “Art is Rubbish/Rubbish is Art.”
The show, which opened on January 17 and runs through February 14, is free and open to the public. Learn more about Zacharevic’s work here.
instagram:


Reclaiming Penang’s Old Hin Bus Depot with Art
For more photos from Ernest Zacharevic’s solo exhibition in Penang, Malaysia, explore the Hin Company Bus Depot location page.
A reclaimed bus depot in Penang, Malaysia, is home to the first solo show by Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (@ernestzacharevic). Adorning the Hin Company Bus Depot with dozens of murals and other site-specific installations, Zacharevic challenges the distinction between decay and art in an exhibit he’s named “Art is Rubbish/Rubbish is Art.”
The show, which opened on January 17 and runs through February 14, is free and open to the public. Learn more about Zacharevic’s work here.
instagram:


Reclaiming Penang’s Old Hin Bus Depot with Art
For more photos from Ernest Zacharevic’s solo exhibition in Penang, Malaysia, explore the Hin Company Bus Depot location page.
A reclaimed bus depot in Penang, Malaysia, is home to the first solo show by Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (@ernestzacharevic). Adorning the Hin Company Bus Depot with dozens of murals and other site-specific installations, Zacharevic challenges the distinction between decay and art in an exhibit he’s named “Art is Rubbish/Rubbish is Art.”
The show, which opened on January 17 and runs through February 14, is free and open to the public. Learn more about Zacharevic’s work here.
+
instagram:


Celebrating the Lunar New Year in South Korea
To see more photos and videos of Seollal traditions, browse the #설날 (Seollal), #떡국 (teokguk), #세배 (sebae) and #세뱃돈 (sebae-don) hashtags.
This week, many East Asian countries celebrate the Lunar New Year, which marks the first day of the lunar calendar. In most years, the holiday falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice, which this year is January 31. Many know this holiday as “Chinese New Year” with its dragon dancers, red packets and lanterns, but the holiday also has strong importance and rich traditions in South Korea as well.
In South Korea, the holiday is called Seollal (설날) and is celebrated over a course of three days. The event is one of the most important celebrations of the year for many families who often come together and pay respect to their ancestors. Many Instagrammers in South Korea are sharing the festivities taking place this week.
Traditionally, Seollal celebrations include wearing a formal dress called a hanbok (한복) and performing an act of sebae (세배)—a ceremonial deep bow to the spirits of deceased ancestors or to the eldest members of the household. Many children look forward to this day as they receive a gift of money called sebae don (세뱃돈) after the bowing, which comes enclosed in colorful envelopes. Festive meals are also a big part of Seollal, consisting of a dish called tteokguk (떡국)—a soup with thinly sliced rice cakes and dumplings. The rice cake is a symbol of new beginnings, and eating the rice cake signifies growing a year older with the new year.
instagram:


Celebrating the Lunar New Year in South Korea
To see more photos and videos of Seollal traditions, browse the #설날 (Seollal), #떡국 (teokguk), #세배 (sebae) and #세뱃돈 (sebae-don) hashtags.
This week, many East Asian countries celebrate the Lunar New Year, which marks the first day of the lunar calendar. In most years, the holiday falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice, which this year is January 31. Many know this holiday as “Chinese New Year” with its dragon dancers, red packets and lanterns, but the holiday also has strong importance and rich traditions in South Korea as well.
In South Korea, the holiday is called Seollal (설날) and is celebrated over a course of three days. The event is one of the most important celebrations of the year for many families who often come together and pay respect to their ancestors. Many Instagrammers in South Korea are sharing the festivities taking place this week.
Traditionally, Seollal celebrations include wearing a formal dress called a hanbok (한복) and performing an act of sebae (세배)—a ceremonial deep bow to the spirits of deceased ancestors or to the eldest members of the household. Many children look forward to this day as they receive a gift of money called sebae don (세뱃돈) after the bowing, which comes enclosed in colorful envelopes. Festive meals are also a big part of Seollal, consisting of a dish called tteokguk (떡국)—a soup with thinly sliced rice cakes and dumplings. The rice cake is a symbol of new beginnings, and eating the rice cake signifies growing a year older with the new year.
instagram:


Celebrating the Lunar New Year in South Korea
To see more photos and videos of Seollal traditions, browse the #설날 (Seollal), #떡국 (teokguk), #세배 (sebae) and #세뱃돈 (sebae-don) hashtags.
This week, many East Asian countries celebrate the Lunar New Year, which marks the first day of the lunar calendar. In most years, the holiday falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice, which this year is January 31. Many know this holiday as “Chinese New Year” with its dragon dancers, red packets and lanterns, but the holiday also has strong importance and rich traditions in South Korea as well.
In South Korea, the holiday is called Seollal (설날) and is celebrated over a course of three days. The event is one of the most important celebrations of the year for many families who often come together and pay respect to their ancestors. Many Instagrammers in South Korea are sharing the festivities taking place this week.
Traditionally, Seollal celebrations include wearing a formal dress called a hanbok (한복) and performing an act of sebae (세배)—a ceremonial deep bow to the spirits of deceased ancestors or to the eldest members of the household. Many children look forward to this day as they receive a gift of money called sebae don (세뱃돈) after the bowing, which comes enclosed in colorful envelopes. Festive meals are also a big part of Seollal, consisting of a dish called tteokguk (떡국)—a soup with thinly sliced rice cakes and dumplings. The rice cake is a symbol of new beginnings, and eating the rice cake signifies growing a year older with the new year.
instagram:


Celebrating the Lunar New Year in South Korea
To see more photos and videos of Seollal traditions, browse the #설날 (Seollal), #떡국 (teokguk), #세배 (sebae) and #세뱃돈 (sebae-don) hashtags.
This week, many East Asian countries celebrate the Lunar New Year, which marks the first day of the lunar calendar. In most years, the holiday falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice, which this year is January 31. Many know this holiday as “Chinese New Year” with its dragon dancers, red packets and lanterns, but the holiday also has strong importance and rich traditions in South Korea as well.
In South Korea, the holiday is called Seollal (설날) and is celebrated over a course of three days. The event is one of the most important celebrations of the year for many families who often come together and pay respect to their ancestors. Many Instagrammers in South Korea are sharing the festivities taking place this week.
Traditionally, Seollal celebrations include wearing a formal dress called a hanbok (한복) and performing an act of sebae (세배)—a ceremonial deep bow to the spirits of deceased ancestors or to the eldest members of the household. Many children look forward to this day as they receive a gift of money called sebae don (세뱃돈) after the bowing, which comes enclosed in colorful envelopes. Festive meals are also a big part of Seollal, consisting of a dish called tteokguk (떡국)—a soup with thinly sliced rice cakes and dumplings. The rice cake is a symbol of new beginnings, and eating the rice cake signifies growing a year older with the new year.
instagram:


Celebrating the Lunar New Year in South Korea
To see more photos and videos of Seollal traditions, browse the #설날 (Seollal), #떡국 (teokguk), #세배 (sebae) and #세뱃돈 (sebae-don) hashtags.
This week, many East Asian countries celebrate the Lunar New Year, which marks the first day of the lunar calendar. In most years, the holiday falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice, which this year is January 31. Many know this holiday as “Chinese New Year” with its dragon dancers, red packets and lanterns, but the holiday also has strong importance and rich traditions in South Korea as well.
In South Korea, the holiday is called Seollal (설날) and is celebrated over a course of three days. The event is one of the most important celebrations of the year for many families who often come together and pay respect to their ancestors. Many Instagrammers in South Korea are sharing the festivities taking place this week.
Traditionally, Seollal celebrations include wearing a formal dress called a hanbok (한복) and performing an act of sebae (세배)—a ceremonial deep bow to the spirits of deceased ancestors or to the eldest members of the household. Many children look forward to this day as they receive a gift of money called sebae don (세뱃돈) after the bowing, which comes enclosed in colorful envelopes. Festive meals are also a big part of Seollal, consisting of a dish called tteokguk (떡국)—a soup with thinly sliced rice cakes and dumplings. The rice cake is a symbol of new beginnings, and eating the rice cake signifies growing a year older with the new year.
instagram:


Celebrating the Lunar New Year in South Korea
To see more photos and videos of Seollal traditions, browse the #설날 (Seollal), #떡국 (teokguk), #세배 (sebae) and #세뱃돈 (sebae-don) hashtags.
This week, many East Asian countries celebrate the Lunar New Year, which marks the first day of the lunar calendar. In most years, the holiday falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice, which this year is January 31. Many know this holiday as “Chinese New Year” with its dragon dancers, red packets and lanterns, but the holiday also has strong importance and rich traditions in South Korea as well.
In South Korea, the holiday is called Seollal (설날) and is celebrated over a course of three days. The event is one of the most important celebrations of the year for many families who often come together and pay respect to their ancestors. Many Instagrammers in South Korea are sharing the festivities taking place this week.
Traditionally, Seollal celebrations include wearing a formal dress called a hanbok (한복) and performing an act of sebae (세배)—a ceremonial deep bow to the spirits of deceased ancestors or to the eldest members of the household. Many children look forward to this day as they receive a gift of money called sebae don (세뱃돈) after the bowing, which comes enclosed in colorful envelopes. Festive meals are also a big part of Seollal, consisting of a dish called tteokguk (떡국)—a soup with thinly sliced rice cakes and dumplings. The rice cake is a symbol of new beginnings, and eating the rice cake signifies growing a year older with the new year.
instagram:


Celebrating the Lunar New Year in South Korea
To see more photos and videos of Seollal traditions, browse the #설날 (Seollal), #떡국 (teokguk), #세배 (sebae) and #세뱃돈 (sebae-don) hashtags.
This week, many East Asian countries celebrate the Lunar New Year, which marks the first day of the lunar calendar. In most years, the holiday falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice, which this year is January 31. Many know this holiday as “Chinese New Year” with its dragon dancers, red packets and lanterns, but the holiday also has strong importance and rich traditions in South Korea as well.
In South Korea, the holiday is called Seollal (설날) and is celebrated over a course of three days. The event is one of the most important celebrations of the year for many families who often come together and pay respect to their ancestors. Many Instagrammers in South Korea are sharing the festivities taking place this week.
Traditionally, Seollal celebrations include wearing a formal dress called a hanbok (한복) and performing an act of sebae (세배)—a ceremonial deep bow to the spirits of deceased ancestors or to the eldest members of the household. Many children look forward to this day as they receive a gift of money called sebae don (세뱃돈) after the bowing, which comes enclosed in colorful envelopes. Festive meals are also a big part of Seollal, consisting of a dish called tteokguk (떡국)—a soup with thinly sliced rice cakes and dumplings. The rice cake is a symbol of new beginnings, and eating the rice cake signifies growing a year older with the new year.
+
+
instagram:


Local Lens: Scenes from Small-Town Poland with @ajkajk
In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. To explore more of Poland, follow @ajkajk on Instagram.
"After I finish school I’d like to study photography," says Agata Jackowiak (@ajkajk), an 18-year-old Instagrammer from Oborniki Wielkopolskie, a small town in Poland. Agata captures a vivid snapshot of life in the Polish countryside.
Though it’s a town of only 18,000, Oborniki provides Agata with ample creative inspiration. “Many of my photographs show the streets of my town and the terraced houses I pass by while going to and from school,” Agata says. “A favorite spot here is Obornickie Łazienki by the Wełna River. It’s where people go for scenic walks and to spend time with their families. There is also the old Wroniecki Bridge, which is perfect for Instagramming.”
Outside of Oborniki, Agata suggests visiting Ustronie Morskie, a small town along the Baltic Sea. “There is a long wooden jetty on the beach where you can take pictures of amazing sunrises and sunsets. If the weather is good you can see a lighthouse 13 kilometers (8 miles) away in Kolobrzeg. It is absolutely breathtaking.”
In February, Agata will continue her exploration of Poland—first visiting Warsaw, then Krakow. “If you are interested in the next steps of my journey, follow along!”
instagram:


Local Lens: Scenes from Small-Town Poland with @ajkajk
In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. To explore more of Poland, follow @ajkajk on Instagram.
"After I finish school I’d like to study photography," says Agata Jackowiak (@ajkajk), an 18-year-old Instagrammer from Oborniki Wielkopolskie, a small town in Poland. Agata captures a vivid snapshot of life in the Polish countryside.
Though it’s a town of only 18,000, Oborniki provides Agata with ample creative inspiration. “Many of my photographs show the streets of my town and the terraced houses I pass by while going to and from school,” Agata says. “A favorite spot here is Obornickie Łazienki by the Wełna River. It’s where people go for scenic walks and to spend time with their families. There is also the old Wroniecki Bridge, which is perfect for Instagramming.”
Outside of Oborniki, Agata suggests visiting Ustronie Morskie, a small town along the Baltic Sea. “There is a long wooden jetty on the beach where you can take pictures of amazing sunrises and sunsets. If the weather is good you can see a lighthouse 13 kilometers (8 miles) away in Kolobrzeg. It is absolutely breathtaking.”
In February, Agata will continue her exploration of Poland—first visiting Warsaw, then Krakow. “If you are interested in the next steps of my journey, follow along!”
instagram:


Local Lens: Scenes from Small-Town Poland with @ajkajk
In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. To explore more of Poland, follow @ajkajk on Instagram.
"After I finish school I’d like to study photography," says Agata Jackowiak (@ajkajk), an 18-year-old Instagrammer from Oborniki Wielkopolskie, a small town in Poland. Agata captures a vivid snapshot of life in the Polish countryside.
Though it’s a town of only 18,000, Oborniki provides Agata with ample creative inspiration. “Many of my photographs show the streets of my town and the terraced houses I pass by while going to and from school,” Agata says. “A favorite spot here is Obornickie Łazienki by the Wełna River. It’s where people go for scenic walks and to spend time with their families. There is also the old Wroniecki Bridge, which is perfect for Instagramming.”
Outside of Oborniki, Agata suggests visiting Ustronie Morskie, a small town along the Baltic Sea. “There is a long wooden jetty on the beach where you can take pictures of amazing sunrises and sunsets. If the weather is good you can see a lighthouse 13 kilometers (8 miles) away in Kolobrzeg. It is absolutely breathtaking.”
In February, Agata will continue her exploration of Poland—first visiting Warsaw, then Krakow. “If you are interested in the next steps of my journey, follow along!”
instagram:


Local Lens: Scenes from Small-Town Poland with @ajkajk
In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. To explore more of Poland, follow @ajkajk on Instagram.
"After I finish school I’d like to study photography," says Agata Jackowiak (@ajkajk), an 18-year-old Instagrammer from Oborniki Wielkopolskie, a small town in Poland. Agata captures a vivid snapshot of life in the Polish countryside.
Though it’s a town of only 18,000, Oborniki provides Agata with ample creative inspiration. “Many of my photographs show the streets of my town and the terraced houses I pass by while going to and from school,” Agata says. “A favorite spot here is Obornickie Łazienki by the Wełna River. It’s where people go for scenic walks and to spend time with their families. There is also the old Wroniecki Bridge, which is perfect for Instagramming.”
Outside of Oborniki, Agata suggests visiting Ustronie Morskie, a small town along the Baltic Sea. “There is a long wooden jetty on the beach where you can take pictures of amazing sunrises and sunsets. If the weather is good you can see a lighthouse 13 kilometers (8 miles) away in Kolobrzeg. It is absolutely breathtaking.”
In February, Agata will continue her exploration of Poland—first visiting Warsaw, then Krakow. “If you are interested in the next steps of my journey, follow along!”
instagram:


Local Lens: Scenes from Small-Town Poland with @ajkajk
In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. To explore more of Poland, follow @ajkajk on Instagram.
"After I finish school I’d like to study photography," says Agata Jackowiak (@ajkajk), an 18-year-old Instagrammer from Oborniki Wielkopolskie, a small town in Poland. Agata captures a vivid snapshot of life in the Polish countryside.
Though it’s a town of only 18,000, Oborniki provides Agata with ample creative inspiration. “Many of my photographs show the streets of my town and the terraced houses I pass by while going to and from school,” Agata says. “A favorite spot here is Obornickie Łazienki by the Wełna River. It’s where people go for scenic walks and to spend time with their families. There is also the old Wroniecki Bridge, which is perfect for Instagramming.”
Outside of Oborniki, Agata suggests visiting Ustronie Morskie, a small town along the Baltic Sea. “There is a long wooden jetty on the beach where you can take pictures of amazing sunrises and sunsets. If the weather is good you can see a lighthouse 13 kilometers (8 miles) away in Kolobrzeg. It is absolutely breathtaking.”
In February, Agata will continue her exploration of Poland—first visiting Warsaw, then Krakow. “If you are interested in the next steps of my journey, follow along!”
instagram:


Local Lens: Scenes from Small-Town Poland with @ajkajk
In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. To explore more of Poland, follow @ajkajk on Instagram.
"After I finish school I’d like to study photography," says Agata Jackowiak (@ajkajk), an 18-year-old Instagrammer from Oborniki Wielkopolskie, a small town in Poland. Agata captures a vivid snapshot of life in the Polish countryside.
Though it’s a town of only 18,000, Oborniki provides Agata with ample creative inspiration. “Many of my photographs show the streets of my town and the terraced houses I pass by while going to and from school,” Agata says. “A favorite spot here is Obornickie Łazienki by the Wełna River. It’s where people go for scenic walks and to spend time with their families. There is also the old Wroniecki Bridge, which is perfect for Instagramming.”
Outside of Oborniki, Agata suggests visiting Ustronie Morskie, a small town along the Baltic Sea. “There is a long wooden jetty on the beach where you can take pictures of amazing sunrises and sunsets. If the weather is good you can see a lighthouse 13 kilometers (8 miles) away in Kolobrzeg. It is absolutely breathtaking.”
In February, Agata will continue her exploration of Poland—first visiting Warsaw, then Krakow. “If you are interested in the next steps of my journey, follow along!”
instagram:


Local Lens: Scenes from Small-Town Poland with @ajkajk
In this series, local Instagrammers show you their favorite places to shoot around where they live. To explore more of Poland, follow @ajkajk on Instagram.
"After I finish school I’d like to study photography," says Agata Jackowiak (@ajkajk), an 18-year-old Instagrammer from Oborniki Wielkopolskie, a small town in Poland. Agata captures a vivid snapshot of life in the Polish countryside.
Though it’s a town of only 18,000, Oborniki provides Agata with ample creative inspiration. “Many of my photographs show the streets of my town and the terraced houses I pass by while going to and from school,” Agata says. “A favorite spot here is Obornickie Łazienki by the Wełna River. It’s where people go for scenic walks and to spend time with their families. There is also the old Wroniecki Bridge, which is perfect for Instagramming.”
Outside of Oborniki, Agata suggests visiting Ustronie Morskie, a small town along the Baltic Sea. “There is a long wooden jetty on the beach where you can take pictures of amazing sunrises and sunsets. If the weather is good you can see a lighthouse 13 kilometers (8 miles) away in Kolobrzeg. It is absolutely breathtaking.”
In February, Agata will continue her exploration of Poland—first visiting Warsaw, then Krakow. “If you are interested in the next steps of my journey, follow along!”
+
Dance <3
Dance <3
Dance <3
Dance <3
Dance <3
Dance <3
+
LO EXTRAÑO AUNQUE NO QUIERA ADMITIRLO, EL ME HACIA LA MUJER MAS FELIZ ,PERO LO PERDÍ POR ESTÚPIDA POR ACOMPLEJARME , CON EL PASE MOMENTOS TAN LINDOS , CON NINGUNA PERSONA ME HABÍA PASADO ESO , EL ME QUERÍA DE VERDAD & SIEMPRE ME LO DEMOSTRÓ ,PERO YO SOY SOY UNA & MIL VECES ESTÚPIDA POR DEJARLO IR :( , POR UN MOMENTO PENSÉ QUE YA NO SENTÍA NADA POR EL , SOLO ESTABA CONFUNDIDA Y HICE UNA ESTUPIDEZ AL TERMINAR CON EL ,POR QUE AHORA ME SIENTO MIERDA, ME SIENTO SOLA & TODO EL DÍA PIENSO EN EL … NUNCA DEBÍ DEJARLO IR , EL PENSÓ QUE JUGUÉ CON EL ,QUE LO USE D: . PERO NO SABE LO QUE ESTOY SUFRIENDO AHORA , POR QUE YO EN REALIDAD LO AMABA , LO AMO AÚN , ESPERO QUE ALGÚN DÍA ME PERDONE AUNQUE EL NO LEA ESTO D:
+
baby-this-is-the-life:

couple | via Tumblr auf We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/69326878
+
HUG <3!
+
instagram:

This Weekend, Host a Photo Walk
For more information on how to find a group of Instagrammers near you, visit http://www.meetup.com/Instagram.
This weekend, we’re putting the Weekend Hashtag Project on hold. Instead we’re challenging people around the world to go out on a photo walk with Instagram friends and share their BEST photograph from the walk with #WorldwidePhotoWalk for a chance to be featured on our blog Monday morning! Be sure to include the name of the location where your event took place along with your photo walk’s designated hashtag in your photo caption. Happy adventuring, Instagrammers!
instagram:

This Weekend, Host a Photo Walk
For more information on how to find a group of Instagrammers near you, visit http://www.meetup.com/Instagram.
This weekend, we’re putting the Weekend Hashtag Project on hold. Instead we’re challenging people around the world to go out on a photo walk with Instagram friends and share their BEST photograph from the walk with #WorldwidePhotoWalk for a chance to be featured on our blog Monday morning! Be sure to include the name of the location where your event took place along with your photo walk’s designated hashtag in your photo caption. Happy adventuring, Instagrammers!
instagram:

This Weekend, Host a Photo Walk
For more information on how to find a group of Instagrammers near you, visit http://www.meetup.com/Instagram.
This weekend, we’re putting the Weekend Hashtag Project on hold. Instead we’re challenging people around the world to go out on a photo walk with Instagram friends and share their BEST photograph from the walk with #WorldwidePhotoWalk for a chance to be featured on our blog Monday morning! Be sure to include the name of the location where your event took place along with your photo walk’s designated hashtag in your photo caption. Happy adventuring, Instagrammers!
instagram:

This Weekend, Host a Photo Walk
For more information on how to find a group of Instagrammers near you, visit http://www.meetup.com/Instagram.
This weekend, we’re putting the Weekend Hashtag Project on hold. Instead we’re challenging people around the world to go out on a photo walk with Instagram friends and share their BEST photograph from the walk with #WorldwidePhotoWalk for a chance to be featured on our blog Monday morning! Be sure to include the name of the location where your event took place along with your photo walk’s designated hashtag in your photo caption. Happy adventuring, Instagrammers!
instagram:

This Weekend, Host a Photo Walk
For more information on how to find a group of Instagrammers near you, visit http://www.meetup.com/Instagram.
This weekend, we’re putting the Weekend Hashtag Project on hold. Instead we’re challenging people around the world to go out on a photo walk with Instagram friends and share their BEST photograph from the walk with #WorldwidePhotoWalk for a chance to be featured on our blog Monday morning! Be sure to include the name of the location where your event took place along with your photo walk’s designated hashtag in your photo caption. Happy adventuring, Instagrammers!